Klimateology

23rd August, 2010 - Posted by admin - 1 Comment

Remember Kremlinology? A new specialty, which tries to fathom what climate scientists really think by reading in between the lines of peer-reviewed papers is needed.

A recent paper by Borken-Kleefeld et al, “Specific Climate Impact of Passenger and Freight Transport“, gives estimates of the rise in global temperatures cause by different modes of transport. They calculate temperature rises over periods of 5, 20 and 50 years. The inclusion of the shorter five year period is unusual in peer-reviewed climate science papers. To Klimateologists this could be a sign of quiet panic – a bad sign in this year of famine, flood and fire.

Update 2nd September 2010: The Journal of Geophysical Research has recently published “Short-term effects of controlling fossil-fuel soot, biofuel soot and gases, and methane on climate, Arctic ice, and air pollution health” by Mark Z. Jacobson. His study examines the short-term (~15 year) effects of controlling forcing agents, particularly soot and methane on global and Arctic  temperatures. Note “short-term” and “Arctic”.  His conclusion that controlling soot may be a faster method of reducing Arctic ice loss and global warming than other options is important but for Klimateologists “short-term” and “Arctic” are both reasons to panic.

Posted on: August 23, 2010

Filed under: Uncategorized

1 Comment

No Planes » Suspension suspended – planes still bad

August 23rd, 2010 at 9:54 am    


[...] inclusion of the shorter five year period is unusual in peer-reviewed climate science papers. To Klimateologists trying to fathom what climate scientists really think this could be a sign of quiet panic – a [...]

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